Posts for: September, 2014

By M & C Dental Center
September 23, 2014
Category: Oral Health
MichaelDouglasPleaGetScreenedforOralCancer

Actor Michael Douglas shocked TV audiences across the country when he announced on the David Letterman Show in 2010 that he has stage IV oral cancer. Fortunately, the cancer had not spread and his radiation and chemotherapy treatments were successful. This year, Douglas teamed up with the Oral Cancer Foundation to warn others about the dangers of the disease and the importance of early detection. In particular, he wants younger people to know that even if they don't smoke and drink a lot, as he admitted to Letterman that he did, they are still at risk.

As Douglas states in a PSA he made with the foundation, “the fastest growing segment of the people developing oral cancers are young, non smokers.” That's due to a strain of the Human Papilloma Virus known as HPV16 that can be transmitted through oral sex. So it's important to avoid risky sexual behaviors and to be screened regularly for this devastating disease that claims one life every hour in the U.S., according to the Oral Cancer Foundation.

An oral cancer screening is a simple visual and tactile exam done right here at the dental office. We will feel your neck for lumps and inspect your lips and all inside surfaces of the mouth, including the back of your throat, for any suspicious signs. If any are found, a biopsy (laboratory analysis of a tissue sample) can be ordered.

Most oral cancers are “squamous” (small scale-shaped) cell carcinomas that occur in the lining of the mouth and are often preceded by recognizable changes (lesions) of the oral membranes. White or red patches begin to form in the pre-cancerous stage, and as the cancer develops, a non-healing ulcer may appear. If you notice any such changes in your mouth, please let us know.

Michael Douglas ends his PSA with the following plea: “So please, the next time you visit your dentist or your medical doctor, ask for this simple screening. Finding oral cancer in its earliest stages may save your life.” We agree, which is why we always perform this screening during your regular dental check-up. If it's been a while since your last appointment, please come in and see us.

If you would like more information about oral cancer, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about the disease in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Cancer.”


By M & C Dental Center
September 08, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
BleedingGumsareaPossibleSignofPeriodontalGumDisease

If you notice your gums bleeding when you brush your teeth, you’re not alone — it’s estimated that as many as 90% of the population have at some time had the same experience. That doesn’t mean it’s normal, though; in fact, unless you’re pregnant, have a systemic condition like diabetes or take blood-thinning medication, it’s more likely a sign that an infection has caused your gums to become inflamed and tender. The infection arises from a bacterial biofilm that’s been allowed to accumulate on tooth surfaces due to inadequate brushing and flossing.

If not treated, the early form of this infection known as gingivitis can develop into a more serious form of gum disease in which the various tissues that help attach teeth to the jaw become infected and eventually detach. As it progresses, detachment forms voids known as periodontal pocketing between the teeth and gum tissues. The end result is receding gum tissue, bone loss and eventually tooth loss.

If you begin to notice your gums bleeding when you brush, you should make an appointment with us for an examination — and the sooner the better. During the exam we’ll physically probe the spaces between your teeth and gum tissues with a periodontal probe, a thin instrument with a blunt end marked in millimeters. As we probe we’ll determine the quality of the gum tissue — whether the probe inserts easily (a sign the tissues are inflamed) or gives resistance (a sign of healthy tissue). We’ll also determine the degree of detachment by measuring the depth of the insertion with the millimeter scale on the probe.

The presence of bleeding during this examination is a strong indication of periodontal disease. Taking this with other signs we encounter during the exam (including the degree of pus formation in any discovered pockets) we can then more accurately determine the existence and level of advancement of the disease.

While gum disease is highly treatable, the best results occur when the condition is discovered early, before the infection severely damages tissues around the teeth. Being on the lookout for bleeding and gum tenderness and responding to it quickly can significantly simplify the necessary periodontal treatment.

If you would like more information on bleeding gums and other symptoms of gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”